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Quirky game with a clear message

WDA's latest smartphone game targets professionals, managers and executives

Quirky game with a clear message

-- PHOTO: WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT AGENCY

PLAYERS start out as a chef or nurse in the game, Go Rush!

You have three lives, and the goal is to avoid obstacles and pick up goodies around you.

These goodies - when you pick up training programmes or check out job prospects, for example - will extend your playing time.

But you lose points or lives when you bump into obstacles.

Lose three lives and it is game over, and your career as a chef or nurse ends.

When you chalk up sufficient points, you get to try out new jobs, such as being a tour guide, a teacher or a computer programmer.

There is, however, an obstacle to be avoided at all cost - a red monster called Laziness.

It is game over instantly if you touch it.

Though subtle, the message from the WDA's latest smartphone game is clear: Training and upgrading will extend your productive life as a worker, and even land you new jobs in other sectors.

But when you become lazy, you are done for.

Go Rush! is built for both Apple and Android phone platforms and will be available in May for free.

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