Volunteer not just your money or time, but also your skills.

That was the message from Mr Hsieh Fu Hua, president of the National Council of Social Service (NCSS), as he launched Hearts@Work, a volunteering drive to mark IBM Singapore's 60th anniversary yesterday.

He told an audience of around 100 staff: "Companies bring not just products, but also skills. It's their range of resources and experience in whatever field. They can use that and try to find solutions for problems in society."

Four voluntary welfare organisations of the NCSS attended the event at IBM's offices in Changi. Their leaders explained how members of the corporate sector could better involve themselves as volunteers in their organisations.

Mr Tim Oei, CEO of the Asian Women's Welfare Association, said: "One of the things we would really appreciate is learning...how to make our work processes tighter. In that sense, skills-based volunteerism is critical."

IBM has been encouraging volunteerism for the past few years. The technology giant aims to organise at least 60 volunteer activities for its employees in Singapore by the end of this year.

According to a straw poll conducted by the company, more than half of its staff here are currently engaged in at least occasional volunteer work.

Mr Quek Khor Ping, director of the IBM Cloud Lab, is one such employee.

Besides working full-time in IBM, he is also the director of Abilities Beyond Limitations and Expectations, a non-profit organisation which helps the physically challenged.

Mr Quek said: "Many organisations that provide help to the physically challenged need IT skills to help them. Business skills, like collaborating with partners and colleagues to get projects done, are also very handy."

Volunteer not just your money or time, but also your skills.

That was the message from Mr Hsieh Fu Hua, president of the National Council of Social Service (NCSS), as he launched Hearts@Work, a volunteering drive to mark IBM Singapore's 60th anniversary yesterday.

He told an audience of around 100 staff: "Companies bring not just products, but also skills. It's their range of resources and experience in whatever field. They can use that and try to find solutions for problems in society."

Four voluntary welfare organisations of the NCSS attended the event at IBM's offices in Changi. Their leaders explained how members of the corporate sector could better involve themselves as volunteers in their organisations.

Mr Tim Oei, CEO of the Asian Women's Welfare Association, said: "One of the things we would really appreciate is learning...how to make our work processes tighter. In that sense, skills-based volunteerism is critical."

IBM has been encouraging volunteerism for the past few years. The technology giant aims to organise at least 60 volunteer activities for its employees in Singapore by the end of this year.

According to a straw poll conducted by the company, more than half of its staff here are currently engaged in at least occasional volunteer work.

Mr Quek Khor Ping, director of the IBM Cloud Lab, is one such employee.

Besides working full-time in IBM, he is also the director of Abilities Beyond Limitations and Expectations, a non-profit organisation which helps the physically challenged.

 

Mr Quek said: "Many organisations that provide help to the physically challenged need IT skills to help them. Business skills, like collaborating with partners and colleagues to get projects done, are also very handy."