AT least 50 per cent of all companies will have a chief security officer (CSO) of some sort in their C-suites in five years' time, as opposed to less than one per cent which currently do, according to Naveen Bhat, Ixia's vice-president and Asia-Pacific general manager.
Ixia, headquartered in California, provides test systems and service verification platforms for wireless and wired infrastructures and services. For example, Ixia's test solutions are used to verify that converged IP networks operate reliably and are secure from threats.
Mr Bhat talked about the emergence of cybersecurity professions as a response to the increasing prevalence and severity of cyberattacks.
Just as how jobs in website design and application development were the result of industry trends, a new wave of cybersecurity professions will take off as companies realise that "the enormity of cybercrime has far surpassed the ability of organisations to deal with them".
"Till 9/11, airport security was important but not that important. After 9/11 the whole airport security business just ballooned. Similarly, this is the time that you see a large number of cybercrimes. The Bank of Muscat was a big one, Target is the biggest one now . . . All it takes is a few more of these incidents to happen then consumers will be asking their organisations: Do you have more security? A more secure organisation would mean more business than a less secure organisation."
Bank Muscat was hit last year when 12 pre-paid travel cards were compromised and US retailing giant Target had credit card data of its customers stolen.
The rise in cybercrime can be attributed in part to the proliferation of technological devices that create many vulnerable entry points into a company's and even personal cyber structures, as well as the lucrativeness of these criminal activities. Distributional denial of service, online fraudulent activities and data leakages were amongst the specific problems organisations face today, said Mr Bhat.
Singapore is taking a leading position in establishing a very secure network, according to Lieu Chin Chuan, course chair for Singapore Polytechnic's Diploma in Infocomm Security Management. SP's Cyber Security Academy, a first in the region, is an example of such leadership. He said the cyber security course is able to provide the most realistic environment to train and prepare for future cyberattacks in Singapore.
For example, along with using Ixia's BreakingPoint Storm system to simulate real-life enterprise networks and generate real-life hacking scenarios, the Cyber Security Academy also imparts important soft skills such as effective communication and the ability to learn into its students.

AT least 50 per cent of all companies will have a chief security officer (CSO) of some sort in their C-suites in five years' time, as opposed to less than one per cent which currently do, according to Naveen Bhat, Ixia's vice-president and Asia-Pacific general manager.

Ixia, headquartered in California, provides test systems and service verification platforms for wireless and wired infrastructures and services. For example, Ixia's test solutions are used to verify that converged IP networks operate reliably and are secure from threats.

Mr Bhat talked about the emergence of cybersecurity professions as a response to the increasing prevalence and severity of cyberattacks.

Just as how jobs in website design and application development were the result of industry trends, a new wave of cybersecurity professions will take off as companies realise that "the enormity of cybercrime has far surpassed the ability of organisations to deal with them".

"Till 9/11, airport security was important but not that important. After 9/11 the whole airport security business just ballooned. Similarly, this is the time that you see a large number of cybercrimes. The Bank of Muscat was a big one, Target is the biggest one now . . . All it takes is a few more of these incidents to happen then consumers will be asking their organisations: Do you have more security? A more secure organisation would mean more business than a less secure organisation."

Bank Muscat was hit last year when 12 pre-paid travel cards were compromised and US retailing giant Target had credit card data of its customers stolen.

The rise in cybercrime can be attributed in part to the proliferation of technological devices that create many vulnerable entry points into a company's and even personal cyber structures, as well as the lucrativeness of these criminal activities. Distributional denial of service, online fraudulent activities and data leakages were amongst the specific problems organisations face today, said Mr Bhat.

Singapore is taking a leading position in establishing a very secure network, according to Lieu Chin Chuan, course chair for Singapore Polytechnic's Diploma in Infocomm Security Management. SP's Cyber Security Academy, a first in the region, is an example of such leadership. He said the cyber security course is able to provide the most realistic environment to train and prepare for future cyberattacks in Singapore.

For example, along with using Ixia's BreakingPoint Storm system to simulate real-life enterprise networks and generate real-life hacking scenarios, the Cyber Security Academy also imparts important soft skills such as effective communication and the ability to learn into its students.