IT IS a given that the business world will get increasingly complex and demanding, and that technology advancements will continue to impact our daily lives. 
Disappearing jobs is one of the end-result of these challenges. 
We tend to operate and think within a framework. We are a logical, orderly and fairly predictable people. 
While this approach has served us well over the past 50 years, I believe it is time now to apply some creativity and consider alternative approaches to earning a living — as a rule, rather than as an exception. 
Here are three key points to consider:
 
1
 Changing mindsets
Many of us have been operating in a one-person-one-job career mode. We have to change our mindset and begin thinking of a career that is made up of more than one set of things or one job. 
You might think this is not practical for many of us as we are already fully stretched with doing just one full-time job, plus parenting and minding the elderly duties as well. 
Yes, that is right. But this should not prevent us from thinking about, and planning for our future. 
We can’t change the fact that we have only 24 hours a day, but we do have the power to decide how we want to use those hours.
Insuring our employability and the ability to continue to earn an income to take care of our living needs is surely important enough for us to allocate time to.
 
2
 Establishing a Plan B
So long as you are a salaried worker, you will always have a shelf life/expiry date — a time when employers do not see you as attractive enough to offer a job, when you become un-employable. 
This typically happens when you are in your 50s. 
Increasingly, you will see expiry dates being brought forward not voluntarily, but by your employers. 
So, having a Plan B when that happens is essential. Better still, have one in place before that happens. 
What can you do to continue having an income when your experience and skill set are no longer required?
Working under the assumption that everyone wants to do something that is aligned to his interests would be a good space to begin thinking about your Plan B.
 
3
 Having a portfolio career
This is one option to consider as a Plan B. As the name suggests, it will consist of a portfolio of things that you do, mostly driven by your interests. 
You will be self-employed and your ability to continue to earn an income will no longer be dependent on your company or your boss.
You will be in charge, and be able to have the power to earn an income for as long as you want. 
This is important, not just from the perspective of earning your keep, but also in keeping the mind active.
With better health care, people are living longer, and the need to continue maintaining our mental and emotional health becomes one of our key priorities. 
Importantly, a portfolio career also allows you to discover your hidden potential — which I strongly believe every one of us has. 
You only have one life — wouldn’t it be such a waste if your potential remains undiscovered?
 To remain relevant to society, you need to constantly re-invent yourself. This has become a necessity, not a choice.  
Worrying about disappearing jobs gives you something to do, but it gets you absolutely nowhere.  
One of the worst things I can think of, as one ages, is to be of absolutely no use to anyone — and this, to me, is a truly frightening prospect.
Article by Paul Heng, founder/managing director and executive coach of NeXT Career Consulting Group, Asia. For more information, visit www.nextcareer.net 

IT IS a given that the business world will get increasingly complex and demanding, and that technology advancements will continue to impact our daily lives. 

Disappearing jobs is one of the end-result of these challenges. 

We tend to operate and think within a framework. We are a logical, orderly and fairly predictable people. 

While this approach has served us well over the past 50 years, I believe it is time now to apply some creativity and consider alternative approaches to earning a living — as a rule, rather than as an exception. 

Here are three key points to consider:

1 Changing mindsets

Many of us have been operating in a one-person-one-job career mode. We have to change our mindset and begin thinking of a career that is made up of more than one set of things or one job. 

You might think this is not practical for many of us as we are already fully stretched with doing just one full-time job, plus parenting and minding the elderly duties as well. 

Yes, that is right. But this should not prevent us from thinking about, and planning for our future. 

We can’t change the fact that we have only 24 hours a day, but we do have the power to decide how we want to use those hours.

Insuring our employability and the ability to continue to earn an income to take care of our living needs is surely important enough for us to allocate time to.

2 Establishing a Plan B

So long as you are a salaried worker, you will always have a shelf life/expiry date — a time when employers do not see you as attractive enough to offer a job, when you become un-employable. 

This typically happens when you are in your 50s. 

Increasingly, you will see expiry dates being brought forward not voluntarily, but by your employers. 

So, having a Plan B when that happens is essential. Better still, have one in place before that happens. 

What can you do to continue having an income when your experience and skill set are no longer required?

Working under the assumption that everyone wants to do something that is aligned to his interests would be a good space to begin thinking about your Plan B.

3 Having a portfolio career

This is one option to consider as a Plan B. As the name suggests, it will consist of a portfolio of things that you do, mostly driven by your interests. 

You will be self-employed and your ability to continue to earn an income will no longer be dependent on your company or your boss.

You will be in charge, and be able to have the power to earn an income for as long as you want. 

This is important, not just from the perspective of earning your keep, but also in keeping the mind active.

With better health care, people are living longer, and the need to continue maintaining our mental and emotional health becomes one of our key priorities. 

Importantly, a portfolio career also allows you to discover your hidden potential — which I strongly believe every one of us has. 

You only have one life — wouldn’t it be such a waste if your potential remains undiscovered?

 To remain relevant to society, you need to constantly re-invent yourself. This has become a necessity, not a choice.  

Worrying about disappearing jobs gives you something to do, but it gets you absolutely nowhere.  

One of the worst things I can think of, as one ages, is to be of absolutely no use to anyone — and this, to me, is a truly frightening prospect.


Article by Paul Heng, founder/managing director and executive coach of NeXT Career Consulting Group, Asia. For more information, visit www.nextcareer.net