JUST 20 per cent of employees here describe themselves as being totally committed to their jobs, going by the latest Global Workforce Index published by Kelly Services, a global talent recruitment company.
It is a figure that has been going down; back in 2010, 38 per cent here felt committed to their jobs.
Measured against the region, Singaporean employees come off relatively poorly: the level of employee commitment is 41 per cent in Indonesia, 28 per cent in Malaysia, and 27 per cent in China.
The survey by Kelly Services involved nearly 230,000 people across 31 countries; of that number, more than 1,500 were from Singapore.
The poll, done through questionnaires, also found that 40 per cent of employees here say they feel valued by their employers. This number has been stable in recent years, but here again, Singapore workers come off worse than their regional counterparts.
In Indonesia, 58 per cent of employees feel their efforts are appreciated by their employers; in China, it is 52 per cent, and in Malaysia, 46 per cent.
However, from the figures, it appears that though employees here feel less committed and less valued, it is not translating into higher attrition rates.
In separate survey questions on loyalty to the company, 30 per cent of the Singapore respondents said they feel less loyal to their employers than before; and just over half (53 per cent) plan to look for a new job this year.
These were among the lowest figures in the region, where, on average, 35 per cent said they were feeling less loyal and 64 per cent were making plans to leave.
The poll, which also explored the reasons people give for changing jobs, found salary and benefits to be the key reason for 66 per cent of employees here.
Mark Hall, vice-president and country general manager for Kelly Services Singapore, said, however: "Our findings show that, while salary and benefits are central to an employee's priorities, advancement, strong leadership and flexibility are important motivators as well.
"This suggests an ambitious workforce looking for mentorship and development opportunities. These considerations will become even more critical as competition for top talent continues."

JUST 20 per cent of employees here describe themselves as being totally committed to their jobs, going by the latest Global Workforce Index published by Kelly Services, a global talent recruitment company.

It is a figure that has been going down; back in 2010, 38 per cent here felt committed to their jobs.

Measured against the region, Singaporean employees come off relatively poorly: the level of employee commitment is 41 per cent in Indonesia, 28 per cent in Malaysia, and 27 per cent in China.

The survey by Kelly Services involved nearly 230,000 people across 31 countries; of that number, more than 1,500 were from Singapore.

The poll, done through questionnaires, also found that 40 per cent of employees here say they feel valued by their employers. This number has been stable in recent years, but here again, Singapore workers come off worse than their regional counterparts.

In Indonesia, 58 per cent of employees feel their efforts are appreciated by their employers; in China, it is 52 per cent, and in Malaysia, 46 per cent.

However, from the figures, it appears that though employees here feel less committed and less valued, it is not translating into higher attrition rates.

In separate survey questions on loyalty to the company, 30 per cent of the Singapore respondents said they feel less loyal to their employers than before; and just over half (53 per cent) plan to look for a new job this year.

These were among the lowest figures in the region, where, on average, 35 per cent said they were feeling less loyal and 64 per cent were making plans to leave.

The poll, which also explored the reasons people give for changing jobs, found salary and benefits to be the key reason for 66 per cent of employees here.

Mark Hall, vice-president and country general manager for Kelly Services Singapore, said, however: "Our findings show that, while salary and benefits are central to an employee's priorities, advancement, strong leadership and flexibility are important motivators as well.

"This suggests an ambitious workforce looking for mentorship and development opportunities. These considerations will become even more critical as competition for top talent continues."