A PARAMEDIC who tended to the injured during the Little India riot and a doctor who volunteered his services to help typhoon victims were among a record 76 health-care workers honoured at the annual Healthcare Humanity Awards ceremony yesterday.
The awards recognise health-care professionals for courage, compassion, dedication and selfless contributions.
And to mark its 10-year milestone this year, a new Honourable Mention Award was started to honour those who have gone beyond the call of duty and ventured into humanitarian efforts, either locally or beyond Singapore. Those who demonstrated immense courage in the line of duty also fell under this category.
Apart from a medal and certificate, winners of the Healthcare Humanity Awards received $1,500, while those who received the Honourable Mention Award were given an additional $500. They received their awards from President Tony Tan Keng Yam and Health Minister Gan Kim Yong at a special ceremony marking the awards' 10th anniversary.
Since 2004, about $1 million has been given to 593 health-care workers. The money, drawn from a $32 million Courage Fund, was amassed from public, private and government donations to help Sars victims and health-care workers in 2003. More than $13.7 million remains.
National Healthcare Group chief executive officer Chee Yam Cheng, who also sits on the fund's Board of Trustees, said: "Fortunately, Singapore has not suffered from another outbreak like Sars. But we want to be ready... But for now, we must also reward health-care workers who do their jobs tirelessly."

A PARAMEDIC who tended to the injured during the Little India riot and a doctor who volunteered his services to help typhoon victims were among a record 76 health-care workers honoured at the annual Healthcare Humanity Awards ceremony yesterday.

The awards recognise health-care professionals for courage, compassion, dedication and selfless contributions.

And to mark its 10-year milestone this year, a new Honourable Mention Award was started to honour those who have gone beyond the call of duty and ventured into humanitarian efforts, either locally or beyond Singapore. Those who demonstrated immense courage in the line of duty also fell under this category.

Apart from a medal and certificate, winners of the Healthcare Humanity Awards received $1,500, while those who received the Honourable Mention Award were given an additional $500. They received their awards from President Tony Tan Keng Yam and Health Minister Gan Kim Yong at a special ceremony marking the awards' 10th anniversary.

Since 2004, about $1 million has been given to 593 health-care workers. The money, drawn from a $32 million Courage Fund, was amassed from public, private and government donations to help Sars victims and health-care workers in 2003. More than $13.7 million remains.

National Healthcare Group chief executive officer Chee Yam Cheng, who also sits on the fund's Board of Trustees, said: "Fortunately, Singapore has not suffered from another outbreak like Sars. But we want to be ready... But for now, we must also reward health-care workers who do their jobs tirelessly."