COMPANIES, which are required by law from July 2 to appoint data protection officers (DPOs), will soon be able to send their selected employees for training to prepare them for this role.
A programme providing hands-on training was launched yesterday to train these employees in approaching and managing data and privacy protection for their respective companies.
The programme is set up by the Employment and Employability Institute (e2i) of the National Trades Union Congress (NTUC), and will be delivered by Straits Interactive, a specialist in personal data protection and solutions for compliance with the regulations of the Do Not Call Registry.
The first of its kind in Singapore, the programme is to start on June 19 and be targeted at employees of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) who have been appointed as DPOs for their companies.
Companies that send their employees for the programme will foot only half the fee; the e2i will bear the other half.
The launch of the programme comes in response to the introduction of the Personal Data Protection Act (PDPA), which has created a need for skilled DPOs to ensure their companies' compliance with the Act, to be enforced from July. Each company is to appoint one or more DPOs.
Those who undergo the training in the four-module programme will have to do a project on data protection in their own organisation; the project is designed to get them to assess their own organisation's current levels of compliance with the Act, and take the necessary measures to address gaps or risks.
The programme will introduce the necessary tools for managing compliance and incidents, as well as communication management; programme participants will draft their own compliance policies.
Straits Interactive chief executive Kevin Shepherdson said: "This practical programme encapsulates the best practices of our PDPA consultancy and takes a lot out of the guesswork of 'How do I get compliant and stay compliant'.
"The most important takeaway for participants in the programme is that they would have started compliance efforts for the company."

COMPANIES, which are required by law from July 2 to appoint data protection officers (DPOs), will soon be able to send their selected employees for training to prepare them for this role.

A programme providing hands-on training was launched yesterday to train these employees in approaching and managing data and privacy protection for their respective companies.

The programme is set up by the Employment and Employability Institute (e2i) of the National Trades Union Congress (NTUC), and will be delivered by Straits Interactive, a specialist in personal data protection and solutions for compliance with the regulations of the Do Not Call Registry.

The first of its kind in Singapore, the programme is to start on June 19 and be targeted at employees of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) who have been appointed as DPOs for their companies.

Companies that send their employees for the programme will foot only half the fee; the e2i will bear the other half.

The launch of the programme comes in response to the introduction of the Personal Data Protection Act (PDPA), which has created a need for skilled DPOs to ensure their companies' compliance with the Act, to be enforced from July. Each company is to appoint one or more DPOs.

Those who undergo the training in the four-module programme will have to do a project on data protection in their own organisation; the project is designed to get them to assess their own organisation's current levels of compliance with the Act, and take the necessary measures to address gaps or risks.

The programme will introduce the necessary tools for managing compliance and incidents, as well as communication management; programme participants will draft their own compliance policies.

Straits Interactive chief executive Kevin Shepherdson said: "This practical programme encapsulates the best practices of our PDPA consultancy and takes a lot out of the guesswork of 'How do I get compliant and stay compliant'.

"The most important takeaway for participants in the programme is that they would have started compliance efforts for the company."