DIFFERENT strands of the surveying profession will have more independence following a revamp of the Singapore Institute of Surveyors and Valuers (SISV).
Under the new structure, land surveyors, quantity surveyors, and valuers and general practice surveyors will have their own councils. Previously, all three disciplines had to act through a main council, which is the final decision-making body.
The three councils will work independently under the new structure announced yesterday.
Mr Loi Hwee Yong, SISV's president of the land surveyors' council, said: "With the new structure, (each council) can specialise and do things much faster."
He added that when the SISV had one main council, approval had to be sought but the added bureaucracy meant a simple process could take a long time to achieve.
The SISV adopted its new model after its annual general meeting on March 29.
Mr Silas Loh, president of the quantity surveyors' council, said: "We hope to be able to use this specialisation in order to work faster to protect the quality of work."
The new structure allows each council to hold its own annual general meeting, elect members and decide on the admission of members. It will also allow them to organise their own professional activities, attend meetings with government officials and carry out disciplinary enquiries.

DIFFERENT strands of the surveying profession will have more independence following a revamp of the Singapore Institute of Surveyors and Valuers (SISV).

Under the new structure, land surveyors, quantity surveyors, and valuers and general practice surveyors will have their own councils. Previously, all three disciplines had to act through a main council, which is the final decision-making body.

The three councils will work independently under the new structure announced yesterday.

Mr Loi Hwee Yong, SISV's president of the land surveyors' council, said: "With the new structure, (each council) can specialise and do things much faster."

He added that when the SISV had one main council, approval had to be sought but the added bureaucracy meant a simple process could take a long time to achieve.

The SISV adopted its new model after its annual general meeting on March 29.

Mr Silas Loh, president of the quantity surveyors' council, said: "We hope to be able to use this specialisation in order to work faster to protect the quality of work."

The new structure allows each council to hold its own annual general meeting, elect members and decide on the admission of members. It will also allow them to organise their own professional activities, attend meetings with government officials and carry out disciplinary enquiries.