I WAS facilitating an on-site training programme for a business recently. 
Several times during the training, the employees requested for “managers and leaders to acknowledge the positive”.
I have found this to be a common theme in almost every business. 
Employees often feel that the only time they get attention is when they are doing something wrong instead of when they are doing things right.
This is why I intentionally choose to begin my leadership training programmes by having the business owners acknowledge something that they sincerely appreciate about each of the leaders.
In one training event in particular, I took this one step further. 
I encouraged each of the leaders to then share with their team something that they genuinely appreciated about each member of their team.
One of the leaders said: “You know, it’s interesting. While I often thank my employees at the end of the day, I don’t thank them for anything in particular. I just say, ‘thank you’. 
“I’ve realised the value and importance of truly acknowledging the specifics around what they have done that is worthy of acknowledgement.”
Be specific
Think about a time when someone gave you a compliment at work or in your personal life. 
Didn’t it feel great? Did you experience an immediate surge of energy and feel your spirits lift?
Acknowledgement is a gift to both the giver and receiver because both people end up feeling more energised as a result.
Here are three simple tips to powerfully acknowledge another person:
• Start with a simple “thank you”.
• Tell him specifically why you are acknowledging him. Share the details. 
Don’t just say: “Thank you for doing a great job today.” 
Tell him exactly what he did that made you realise that he had done a great job.
• Tell the person how his actions impacted you or another person. 
For example: “I noticed how you took the time to give that customer your full attention today, even though you had lots of other things to do. 
“I could tell that she left the store feeling heard and that you really made a difference to her. It made me feel excited to have someone like you on my team who really cares about our customers.”
Start now
I want to invite you to set the intention to acknowledge at least two people today (identify one person in your business and one person in your personal life).
Decide today that, as a leader, you are going to create a work culture and personal life that is filled with the power of positive acknowledgement.
Article by Leslie Cunningham. For more information, visit www.impactandprofits.com. Article source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Leslie_Cunningham

I WAS facilitating an on-site training programme for a business recently. 

Several times during the training, the employees requested for “managers and leaders to acknowledge the positive”.

I have found this to be a common theme in almost every business. 

Employees often feel that the only time they get attention is when they are doing something wrong instead of when they are doing things right.

This is why I intentionally choose to begin my leadership training programmes by having the business owners acknowledge something that they sincerely appreciate about each of the leaders.

In one training event in particular, I took this one step further. 

I encouraged each of the leaders to then share with their team something that they genuinely appreciated about each member of their team.

One of the leaders said: “You know, it’s interesting. While I often thank my employees at the end of the day, I don’t thank them for anything in particular. I just say, ‘thank you’. 

“I’ve realised the value and importance of truly acknowledging the specifics around what they have done that is worthy of acknowledgement.”

Be specific

Think about a time when someone gave you a compliment at work or in your personal life. 

Didn’t it feel great? Did you experience an immediate surge of energy and feel your spirits lift?

Acknowledgement is a gift to both the giver and receiver because both people end up feeling more energised as a result.

Here are three simple tips to powerfully acknowledge another person:

• Start with a simple “thank you”.

• Tell him specifically why you are acknowledging him. Share the details. 

Don’t just say: “Thank you for doing a great job today.” 

Tell him exactly what he did that made you realise that he had done a great job.

• Tell the person how his actions impacted you or another person. 

For example: “I noticed how you took the time to give that customer your full attention today, even though you had lots of other things to do. 

“I could tell that she left the store feeling heard and that you really made a difference to her. It made me feel excited to have someone like you on my team who really cares about our customers.”

Start now

I want to invite you to set the intention to acknowledge at least two people today (identify one person in your business and one person in your personal life).

Decide today that, as a leader, you are going to create a work culture and personal life that is filled with the power of positive acknowledgement.


Article by Leslie Cunningham. For more information, visit www.impactandprofits.com. Article source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Leslie_Cunningham